Snacks to try in a Korean Convenience Store

So hopefully on your tour of Korea, you come here eating the best Korean food for your breakfast, lunch and dinner. But then there’s late at night when you are sitting in your hotel and wanting something quick to take back to your suite. There are convenient stores all over Korea. Pretty much on every major street corner you will find one, from the global chains to the local ones.

A lot of you will find your basic staples like Coca-cola, Minute Maid Orange Juice and Lays Potato Chips. But there’s a whole world of good eats sitting on the shelves that you probably would never even think of. Simply because you can’t read the labels or they look just so weird! No worries, we are here to help. I will walk us through a convenient store in Korea to talk about the things you shouldn’t miss out on. Or more importantly, what you should avoid!

 

1. Sahm-gak (Triangle) Kimbap: Traditional kimbap comes in rolls like something you might see in sushi. These are made in the triangle form, or sam-gak. They are basically sticky rice stuffed with different kinds of goodness, like beef, chicken, pork and other great things. There are the spicy and non-spicy. Veggie, tuna etc. And they are all wrapped in seaweed lavers to keep them nice and compact. Nice and cheap and great for on-the-go meals or simply a late night snack.

Pay attention to the instructions and illustrations on the back on how to open the packaging up. Otherwise you’ll end up unravelling the whole kimbap on yourself defeating the very purpose of its convenience!

Try the Mayo Tuna featured on this pic. My favorite.

Mayonnaise Tuna Triangle Kimbap

 

2. Doh-she-rahk: Or lunch boxes..but you can have them any time of the day. These are a meal in itself. Comes with rice, meat of choice and a set of side dishes (banchan) and are even more cheaper than going to a restaurant and getting the same thing. The quality of these things have gotten so much better and are the fastest growing items in convenience stores. Demand for cheaper quick meals and the rise of solo eaters have made a market for these. Also celebrity chefs have come up with their own recipes to help boost the appeal of these. Go before lunch and you will see these things piled up in the refrigerated section.

Black rice with spicy pork

 

3. Drinks: What you probably won’t figure out is the tea section. There are all sorts of teas that are extracts from Korean raisins to whiskers of corn husks. All of them are good for you and you can drink them as if they were just non-caloric flavored water. There are also the ones that are made for men, but quite frankly anyone can drink them. You won’t be disappointed with any one of the. As for my favourite drink, it’s a soft-drinks called Milkis. It’s basically like an A&W Cream Soda except its more milkier as the name might suggest.

Definitely a lot of stuff you won’t find back home but that’s what you are out here for, right? To try something new!
Women: Avoid this one at all costs! The character says man. This will grow you balls and chest hair. Just kidding! But yes, marketed to men.

 

 

 

 

 

Kok Kok! Kok

 

 

 

 

4. Ramyeon:  You will find that there is one whole section dedicated simply to ramyeon. Take your pick. I personally like the spicy ones but there are a lot of other good ones without all that kick. Then there are the soupy ramyeons and then the dry ones where you are supposed to drain the water out like the Kok-kok-kok series from the Oddugi brand. You fill them up with hot water just like any other instant noodles. But before you mix in the sauce, make sure to drain the water by lifting up the tag on the cover. Also there are special sections inside the convenient store where you can get hot water as well as dump out the broth in a garbage can.

5. Single-pack Ice cream: You can usually find these in refrigerators just outside the doors of the convenient store. There’s tons to pick from and you probably can’t go wrong with any of them unless you think that uhm, red beans shouldn’t be…sweet. (just want to remind one another of 3 words: Boston baked beans) Anyway, ice cream in Korea is served year round, yes and including winter. And, yes it gets extremely cold here. Remember, we are hosting the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in 2018, so it has to. And have you ever tried eating ice cream in the middle of winter? It’s not so bad and can be euphoric!

Just imagine: You are walking outside and it feels cold on the outside of your body. The inside of your body is warm. But then you eat ice cream. Your body on the inside is getting colder. Now since the outside of your body is cold and the inside of your body is cold, what happens next? Magic. You don’t actually feel cold anymore because the relative feeling of cold is less extreme. Got it? Now try it!

 

Oh yeah and talking about which ice cream to get…I personally love the watermelon ice cream. It’s got 3 different flavors all into one ice cream bar. It’s cut into a watermelon triangle and starts out by biting into the red watermelon flavored part of the ice cream – Awesome! The next thing you will notice is the seeds of the watermelon ice cream. They are made from chocolate covered nuts. And then lastly, is the watermelon rind which is a great finale to it because of its stark contrast in flavor against everything else – melon! Trust me, it all goes wonderfully together.

Su-bak Ba (Watermelon Bar)
Sorry, I couldn’t wait. Had to take a bite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now we can get into the classic must haves too, like banana flavored milk or honey butter chips, but I think there’s already been a ton written about those. You can also get a hot cup of brewed coffee for less than a buck from a machine. You can also get them iced by pouring pouch coffee into a cup of ice the convenient store gives you in the freezer section.

But if you say you’ve got a handle on Korean snacks in convenient stores and are ready for some expert level stuff, try concocting the Mark Special. If you need help translating or want to discover other great recipes, contacting one of our tour guides here.

They just sellin’ cups of ice??

 

 

 

 

 

 

TripRadius.io – The Locals App

We are very excited about the things that are happening with us at KoreanTourGuide.com these days. We just received government funding to do a startup for a new travel app. There is a growing trend of platform businesses around the world that connect travelers with locals, such as Vayable and Triip.me. We want to build out a home-grown version of that adding in our own innovations that are the trademark of Korea, Inc. It’s Uber meets ToursbyLocals meets Meetup.com. KoreanTourGuide.com will still, without a doubt, continue to provide great tours in Korea whereby we connect travelers with tour guides. But now we want to create a sub-entity where we provide another great service connecting travelers with locals to give them – what we believe to be the true local experience.

How do we do that? Well what we plan to do is build out an app like Uber, but rather than hailing a car, you are hailing locals who are ready and willing to show you around your immediate vicinity. You can get on our app, press the location button, and BOOM, BOOM, BOOM, BOOM…on a map 4 to 5 different local people will be around you all within a few hundred meters radius, ready and willing to show you around. You can message them beforehand or book them right away based on price, proximity and profile and they will show up within a matter of minutes. We call it TripRadius.io

These are ordinary people that will show you around the immediate neighborhood or simply take you to that address you are trying to find. They will translate for you, introduce you to their go-to restaurants or just simply hang out, doing the same things they normally do on a normal basis. Things that locals take for granted or don’t put much thought into, from the perspective of the traveler, is a completely unique and unexplored territory for a traveler. This is not asking local people to go out of their way by any means. In fact, it’s something they can do right from wherever they are. They can be at a coffee shop, near their home or even just walking on the street to work. It’s location based so travelers choose guides based on the fact that they are within their proximity.

I’ve been a guide here for about 5 years now. I see tourist behavior and see what they go through here on a day to day basis. And I’m not talking about my own customers, but more so talking about the travelers I see in my periphery. I see their pain points and what they are struggling with. I see opportunity where they are being underserved due to the high barriers of getting a guide.

But I will get into the details more in my future posts. I just wanted to start off a new segment of my blog with an introduction into my new endeavor. Also I want to blog about this new journey into my startup life and talk about my experiences as a means for me to keep myself accountable.

I do believe that this (in one form or another) is the future direction in which travel will go. I don’t think the world is necessarily ready right now, but I do believe that Korea is the place to start. It is a country of early adopters. It has the best internet connectivity in the world and it also is hands down, the safest country in the entire world (granted people can get over this North Korea nuisance). These 3 factors make Korea the perfect ecosystem for an app like this to thrive.

If something is important enough, you should try even if the probable outcome is failure – Elon Musk

The Myeongdong Underground – Navigating through the Mall tunnels

Even though it’s winter now, we still manage to get a lot of tourists in during this time. The snow is quite magical and Korea has some of the best ski resorts all throughout Asia. On the other hand, it can get wickedly cold here and you have to know how to get around quickly and efficiently around here. Most tourists will spend time in the area mapped below. When staying there, its good to get acquainted with the underground tunnels in the Myeongdong district. It’s there you can take refuge from the cold as well as continue your shopping and get to where you need to go.

You can essentially walk from City Hall Station all the way to the DDP at Dongdaemun Culture and History Park without ever taking a step outside. Along the way there are shops and snack stops along the way. A lot of companies have side entrances from these tunnels.

Continue reading The Myeongdong Underground – Navigating through the Mall tunnels

How Honest are Koreans? Let’s take a look..

Following up on the post I did on How Safe Korea Is, I found a video that studies how honest Korean people are. Take a look at how disturbing the video is at first.

http://www.allkpop.com/buzz/2014/10/south-koreans-are-tested-on-honesty-in-a-subway-experiment

Then see what remarkably happens.

Who knows how scientific this study is, but on a personal note, I can agree with it when I compare it to my life in America. You can leave a laptop on a cafe table, come back in 1 hour and it will still be there. Again, that doesn’t mean crime doesn’t exist here. It just manifests itself in different forms.

There is this shame culture here that prevents committing crimes in front of you. Things like burglaries taking place while you are away from your home.

What does this mean? It means that travelers to Korea don’t really need to worry about petty thefts while they are visiting here. It makes it a much more pleasant travel experience compared to other countries where you might have to watch your wallet/purse all the time.

Again, the word of caution is that this is for the most part. And it is clearly evident in the air when you come to see Korea.

KOREA IS VERY SAFE. SAFER THAN..

Coming to Korea from a country, say America, you will immediately feel how safe it is here. Lifestyle9.com just came out with their top 10 list of safest countries to settle. The top 4 countries are in Asia and they go as follows: Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Korea (America is #88). They only give descriptions for the top 3, so we’ll go over Korea specifically. When you come to Korea, without saying a word, foreigners immediately feel unthreatened. There is this sense of social order that people tend to abide by. Nobody gets in your face about anything unwarranted. Nobody is out seeking to get attention. Nobody shows any outward attitude. Yet if you approach any young Korean person randomly walking on the streets with a question, they are immediately happy to help you find your way with a friendly smile. Continue reading KOREA IS VERY SAFE. SAFER THAN..